Trigger Prevention

Sometimes people who suffer from Asthma or COPD with an asthma component will be sensitive to triggers that cause their airways to become restricted, inflamed, and fill with mucous. Some of these common triggers are pollens, animal dander, perfumes, smoke or carbon burned bi-products, dust mites, and plain old cold air. If you know what triggers your asthma, you can incorporate preventive items to minimize your exposure to your known triggers. Make an appointment to discuss your triggers, or potential triggers with one of our Respiratory Therapists. We will give you recommendations on how you can avoid or minimize your exposure to triggers, and improve your quality of...

More tips for Best Breathing

To reduce your shortness of breath during exertion, try the following: Stay active – but slow down. Most people will try to reach their intended destination by walking as fast as they can – so they improve their chances of getting to the destination without having to stop.  Walk slower and you won’t become as short of breath and will be able to reach your destination. Don’t plan too much activity on hot humid days.  As well, try not to do too much exertion in the extreme cold. If your doctor has prescribed a higher rate of oxygen flow to the exertion prescription a few minutes before you exert yourself. Keep this higher flow running until you have stopped your activity and your breathing settles back down. When in a shopping mall, use a shopping cart to walk with, if you don’t normally use other walking aids.  Place your oxygen in the cart and rest some of your body weight on the push handles of the cart. This helps expand the space in your chest cavity, giving more room for your lungs – and it conserves energy!  This is a great way to stay active, see friends and satay out of the elements (ie. cold and heat) that bothers your...

Minimize Shortness of Breath

If you are experiencing shortness of breath, the following steps may help: Stop and rest in a comfortable position, sitting down if possible. Try and remain calm. Lean forward and relax your head and shoulders. Breathe slowly through your nose and out through your mouth using the pursed lip technique. Begin diaphragmatic breathing until you are no longer short of breath. Remain in this position until you feel you have regained adequate control of your...

Controlled Coughing

It is also important to clear phlegm or mucous from your lungs so that you can decrease the risk of infection. Some patients may have difficulty with this and may need to use a controlled cough technique to do so. Sit down and lean forward. Take a slow deep breath and hold it for three seconds. Cough out twice, using your diaphragm muscle to push upward while you cough....